College Degrees-RIP

It’s no secret that the cost of a college degree is ridiculous. You can read almost any personal finance blogger and somewhere they talk about their outstanding student loans or their strategy for paying them off. During the most recent recession in the United States; college admissions soared-but is that really the answer to finding great job that you are passionate about? The answer is NO!

Enter the new era of boot camps. A perfect example is a recent article in Yahoo Finance called Coding boot camps promise to launch tech careers. I believe this is a trend that will force Colleges across the country to make their curriculum more relevant, cut out the BS, and lower tuition to reasonable rates.

From the article: 

Looking for a career change, Ken Shimizu decided he wanted to be a software developer, but he didn’t want to go back to college to study computer science.

Instead, he quit his job and spent his savings to enroll at Dev Bootcamp, a new San Francisco school that teaches students how to write software in nine weeks. The $11,000 gamble paid off: A week after he finished the program last summer, he landed an engineering job that paid more than twice his previous salary.

“It’s the best decision I’ve made in my life,” said Shimizu, 24, who worked in marketing and public relations after graduating from the University of California, Berkeley in 2010. “I was really worried about getting a job, and it just happened like that.”

The boot camps are launching at a time when many recent college graduates are struggling to find jobs that pay enough to chip away at their hefty student loan debts.

The new schools say they are teaching students the real-world skills that employers want but colleges have failed to provide. “Our school is a lot shorter, cheaper and more applicable to the work they’d like to do than universities,” said Shawn Drost, who co-founded Hack Reactor in San Francisco six months ago.

This intensive-learning model can also be used to train workers for other professions for less time and money than what traditional colleges require, Staton said. “We think this is the beginning of a really large movement that will happen across industries,” he said.

Bishay, an Egyptian-born engineer who sold his first software company to Microsoft in 2001, started Dev Bootcamp as an experiment. He wanted to see how quickly he could teach his friend and other non-techies how to write code.

I used about 10 percent of what I learned in college in my first job, and I figured I could teach that 10 percent in two and a half months,” Bishay said.

Dev Bootcamp has trained about 130 students, and 95 percent of them have been hired as software developers, with an average salary of about $80,000, within a few months of graduation, Bishay said. It’s now opening a campus in Chicago.

The school doesn’t just teach technical skills. It teaches students how to work in teams, communicate better and interview for jobs. On graduation day, it invites tech recruiters to meet students at a “speed-dating” job fair.

I really feel this is the future of education for many people. Colleges have priced themselves out of the market and need to get serious and make their education more relevant and cut out all the fat. For all of you entrepreneurs out there….what boot camp could you start up and bring this revolution to many other industries?

I’d love to hear from you and any ideas that you are incorporating into your boot camps!

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Dansette